Equine Performance - Conners Clinic
Equine Performance - Conners Clinic

Equine Performance

Vendor
Standard Process
Regular price
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Sale price
$70.50
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Horses that train rigorously, travel, or compete may experience an inflammatory response, exercise-related muscle soreness, and oxidative stress. Diet, level and amount of exercise, age, and the nature of a training program are all factors that may play a role in maintaining a balance between oxidative stress and antioxidant status in the performance horse.1 Oxidative stress may be the result of decreased antioxidant activity, increased amounts of reactive oxygen species, or both.2 Horses in training may experience a physiological challenge and as a result will attempt to regain homeostasis through coordination of multiple organ systems.3 It is possible that dietary antioxidants may help the horse cope with rigorous athletic demands.4

Equine Performance from Standard Process is a unique blend of whole foods and other ingredients that may help horses in training, traveling, or competition by:

  • Providing important energy and immune response substrates
  • Supporting energy pathways
  • Offering antioxidant support
  • Providing ingredients that may support recovery from strenuous activity*

Indications for Use

  • Horses preparing for, participating in, or recovering from competition
  • Horses preparing for, participating in, or recovering from travel
  • Horses in demanding or rigorous training programs

Key Ingredients

Glutamate, L-glutamine, selenium yest (contains 550 micograms organically bound selenium), ribonucleic acid, tart cherry

Suggested Use

1/4 cup (30 g)/1,000 lb. horse/day, or as directed.

 

Feeding Tips

  • Start slowly by mixing a small amount of powder into the feed.
  • Add the powder to the feed and dampen with water. (Spray bottles can be helpful.) Shake the container to mix the powder with the feed. This will also prevent the powder from settling in the bottom of the feeding container.
  • Mix with unsweetened applesauce and add to the horse’s feed or syringe directly into the horse’s mouth.
  • Add to a mash made of commonly found low-starch pelleted feeds or soaked hay cubes.

1. Williams, C. (2016). The effect of oxidative stress during exercise in the horse. Journal of Animal Science, 94(10), 4067-4075. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27898872.
2. Wong, D.M., Moore, R. M., and Brockus, C.W. (2012). Mechanisms of oxidative injury in equine disease. Compendium (Yardley, PA), 34(8), 6. Retrieved from http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/22935994.
3. McKeever, K. H. (2011). Endocrine alterations in the equine athlete: An update. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice, 27(1), 197-218. doi:10.1016/j.cveq.2011.01.001. 
4. Williams, C. A., and Burk, A. O. (2012). Antioxidant status in elite three-day event horses during competition. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2012, 1-8. doi:10.1155/2012/572090.